This website uses cookies. By using and further navigating this website, you accept this.
Dismiss
Did you know that FlightAware flight tracking is supported by advertising?
You can help us keep FlightAware free by allowing ads from FlightAware.com. We work hard to keep our advertising relevant and unobtrusive to create a great experience. It's quick and easy to whitelist ads on FlightAware or please consider our premium accounts.
Dismiss
Back to Squawk list
  • 28

World's largest passenger airliner lands at DIA for the first time

Submitted
It wasn’t planned, but Denver International Airport proved it can handle the world’s largest passenger airliner Sunday night. That’s because an Airbus A380 had to land in the Mile High City after it was diverted due to an on-board medical issue. The pilot said over air traffic control that he had an epileptic patient. The Air France plane was headed from Los Angeles International Airport to Charles de Gaulle Airport in France, according to DIA spokesperson Emily Williams. (www.9news.com) More...

Sort type: [Top] [Newest]


wmohl
Wolfgang Mohl 2
You can't compare a seizure of a few minutes with an epileptic emergency like status epilepticus - people may and do die from that. Pilots wouldn't have diverted for sure for a seizure lasting a few minutes in a known epileptic.
Everyone should call an ambulance if a seizure lasts longer then 5 minutes and no pilot should contune a flight for hours with such a passenger on board - the passenger may be dead or without a lot of brain left then.
SoNic67
SoNic67 1
They had to dump the fuel before landing. From LA to Denver didn't use that much...
Expensive emergency.
ssmith3104
Stewart Smith 1
I would have expected the over-the-pole flight path from LAX to Paris would not normally have taken them as far East as Denver. I am therefore curious if that airport was chosen because of its altitude and extra long runway and presumably therefore perhaps needing to jettison less fuel?
E1craZ4life
Edward Bardes 2
Searching the flight history of Air France 65, the majority of times has the aircraft flying within diversion range of Denver.
E1craZ4life
Edward Bardes 1
I can see Airbus seeing an opportunity to give the A380 another push forward.
SootBox
SootBox -1
Good luck taking off when it's 90+ at DIA.
bentwing60
bentwing60 4
That's why DEN, there is no DIA in the database, has a 16,000 ft. runway, which they used to depart. Not to mention a whole bunch at 12,000. Actually, all the rest of them. And it was between 28 and 31 degrees F. when they departed, so they might have needed half of it for BFL. Not a fat white tick fan but AB operators understand performance #'s for the 380, 2/3 of them fly out of the sandbox! They could operate out of DEN year around if any body wanted to.
siriusloon
siriusloon 5
The article doesn't claim that "DIA" is the ICAO code for "Denver International Airport", it's simply using DIA as an acronym. Considering that it's a TV station's newscast for the masses and not a trade publication for professionals and already-know-it-all enthusiasts, an acronym rather than the ICAO code is acceptable.
bentwing60
bentwing60 1
Only if you are not concerned with being "correct". Being wrong twice is NOT being right! Remind me to never "Quote" you.
spinoneone
Paul Wisgerhof 0
Part of this is just being from Denver. The airport opened in 1995 as DIA because Stapleton airport, called DEN, had not yet been decommissioned. That happened in 1998 and then ICAO transferred the DEN appellation to the new airport. As far as the A380 is concerned, it might be able to land and just roll to a stop on runway 16L/34R, which is 16,000 feet long.
dnorthern
dnorthern 1
23 years ago and counting.
leonkay
Leon Kay 0
This was a very costly decision to take with an epileptic passenger on board. As a first aider at work we are instructed NOT to call for an ambulance in event of a colleague having an epileptic seizure, as it is not considered a medical emergency. As this condition only lasts for a few minutes the person has normally recovered by the time an ambulance arrives. While my wife and I were on a domestic flight we had quite a fright when a teenager in the row behind us started making loud unusual noises. His sister that was seated next to him informed us not to worry as his condition will be over soon.
dnorthern
dnorthern -2
It is DEN. Not DIA. The writer should use factual terms. Not made up crap
stansdds
It's a local tv station news story, you cannot possibly expect them to do any homework and get all the facts. They simply have no time to gather all the facts and get the story out before anyone else.

Don Henley sang it best with his song "Dirty Laundry".
QuickBurn
QuickBurn 2
When they say "DIA," they're just shortening the name of Denver Int'l Airport. It has nothing to do with getting the ident wrong. It's been that way since they broke ground on the place.
dnorthern
dnorthern 2
Calling something what it is not does not make it something it isn’t. You shorten it to the proper DEN
bentwing60
bentwing60 2
Thanx!
Ajioz
You mean there was no medical team of board to arrest the issue, instead of the pilot changing route.
siriusloon
siriusloon 3
No. Of course not. Airlines do not fill seats that would otherwise produce revenue with highly-trained medical professionals that would also cost them money.

There are services that are under contract to airlines that provide qualified doctors via radio to assist airlines and cabin crews in an emergency. A series about modern aviation on PBS a year or two ago covered this in detail. They can recommend that a pilot continue to the original destination or divert.
SoNic67
SoNic67 1
Epileptic passenger.

Login

Don't have an account? Register now (free) for customized features, flight alerts, and more!