Back to Squawk list
  • 3

Cirrus Deployed Parachute in Fayetteville, AR

Submitted
A 2014 Cirrus SR20 appears to have lost its engine in IFR weather, deploys parachute. (www.nwahomepage.com) More...

Sort type: [Top] [Newest]


cwenzler
Chris Wenzler 1
(Duplicate Squawk Submitted)

Plane with parachute lands in city street

A small plane crashed Tuesday morning near Fayetteville High School along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, according to the Fayetteville Fire Department.

The aircraft, a 2014 Cirrus SR-22 fixed-wing single-engine plane, is registered to WG Aviation LLC of Rogers, according to records.

A man on the scene with blood on his chin was treated by medics.

http://www.nwaonline.com/news/2015/nov/03/small-plane-crashes-mlk-fayetteville/?latest
joelwiley
joel wiley 1
Short flight
http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N857SW/history/20151103/1530Z/KVBT/KACT
bbabis
bbabis 1
Hard to say anything should have been done differently when everybody is OK. Insurance can take care of the rest. I bet he misses his professionally flown Global though.
n23bt
Its easy to second guess a pilot in an emergency situation, while we are sitting in a comfortable desk chair. I think he did an outstanding job given his choices. This is a score for technology and an advanced parachute.
damonharvey
Damon Harvey 1
Great Story and many great comments here. But we have very few facts. Did the engine quit all together or did he shut it down? Or was it still running when they crash landed?
Having some portion of a running engine can be better than drifting into power lines, cars and trucks doing 70mph, or a classroom full of kids..need I go on here?
I have watched as a Bonanza with 2 completely destroyed jugs landed on airport with engine power with no damage to airframe. The new owner and his instructor did their best to get back to the field. The were fully prepared to put in down in the corn field if need be.
Perhaps he relied to much on the technology and just took the "checklist" way out...without really assessing his assets. Some power and a huge controlled field 3 miles away?? Sure everyone is alive, this time, but did he make the BEST decision? Im not sure.
With all due respect to the Man, Im just not one to let "Jesus take the Wheel".
damonharvey
Damon Harvey 1
I would also add this,
unless you have spent a lot of time bumping around below 5000 ft in all kinds of wind and rain and low clouds, one might be more inclined to just pull the rip cord.
I have flown with some guys who think clouds and rain are like brick buildings, NEVER go near them! Which is nonsense. Its going to happen sometime so get used to the feeling and don't just push the panic button. Imagine this guy trying to fly in Alaska. He would never get off the ground! Or he would be burning 500lbs of fuel on every flight shooting 20 mile straight in ILSs, which by the way would limit him to about 14 airports in AK. The CEO types that have been flying in the back of G4s, might need to get some 'recurrent" before bumping around in the clouds. (Im sure someone will post that this guy has 20,0000 hours in a SuperCuB in Antarctica, sure)
zcolescott
So...no where near an airport?
linbb
linbb 1
Umm seems that way as am sure that he would rather have put it down on a airport. Don't you think?????
zcolescott
Well, 17 miles to Northwest Arkansas Regional...not sure if anything closer.
bentwing60
bentwing60 6
Not sure it matters these days, I think the first section of the Cirrus checklist is parachute deployment.
linbb
linbb 3
If not should be the second after tightening your seat belt. Seems there is a lot of engine failures on these think its an IO550.
bentwing60
bentwing60 1
Yep on the IO550.
brybur
brybur 5
He was only about 3 miles from KFYV, large runway, towered. There are several airports in the vicinity. It was foggy this morning, so I'm guessing didn't want to shoot an ILS with no engine. Pretty hilly around the airport to the south, no good place to go if you had to go missed.
bentwing60
bentwing60 2
Not much goin missed with no engine, at any rate the KFYV auto for 10 am was clear and 10 but that is an ao2 observation and could have been looking at a hole in the clouds, but it called no ceiling. The 12 am weather 1400 over and 10.
linbb
linbb -2
Don't quite understand your post but because the auto calls clear or cloudy its not an aviation weather report that can be relied on. Have called FSO for Seattle weather only to find out its socked in. Then the next call is to an FBO at BFI for a visual report have found that the sky's were broken to clear. Guess its the guy in the left seat that makes the call as its his life on the line.
bentwing60
bentwing60 6
Don't quite understand your post. Since the auto weather observations are the only observations at most non-towered and many part time towered airports the FAA considers their observation controlling for commercial operations (parts 121, 135, 91 sub-part K etc.) and therefore the only source of "legal" weather available to the pilot! From that point on, it's what's outside the windshield. My disseminating the reported weather at the time of this event in no way impacted or really questioned the decision of this PIC to make the choice to use the chute and in no way questions the responsibility or privileges of the PIC in any aircraft. The introduction of technology (epirb, GPS, chute, gopro camera) has inspired a class of would be discovery channel reality stars that would not exist otherwise, much to the chagrin of our stretched thin SAR forces, and that is an easily observable fact. Having spent some 35 years and 10,000+ hrs. of my existence rattling around the countryside in contraptions that burned either jet-a or 100 low lead, some of that time having none of those modern conveniences, most in the left seat, I consider this a reasonable basis for my credentials to comment on this forum and the fact that I still do so, a fairly accurate indicator of the success of my chosen career. I'm guessing from your posting history on this forum, you might not have been so happy with yours. Cheers.
jacobwall
jacob wall 1
First, I want to take a business class with this man. Flying to class every time to teach, that's someone who has a lot of passion for what they're teaching. However, what I found odd was that even at 9500 feet MSL he had plenty of time to glide but chose to rapidly descend. bentwing60 brought up the METAR as clear and 10, although it could of been a hole as he noted.
jhjardine
jhjardine 0
(Duplicate Squawk Submitted)

Ex Walmart CEO successfully deploys Cirrus Balistic Parachute following engine failure

As a Cirrus SR20 driver, I am pleased to see yet another example of a successful Cirrus parachute deployment. It is, however, troubling to read the article's comments. Aside from the scathing rebukes directed toward the "1%" crowd, there are a number of "pilot" commenters that threw in their two cents without having ever read a Cirrus POH. While all Private Pilots receive engine out, gliding and off airport landing training, Cirrus decided that with the parachute equipment on the Cirrus that the best course of action is to pull the chute if gliding to an airport is not feasible. It is memorialized in the emergency checklists. Unfortunately, several pilot commenters characterized the incident as an illustration of a lack of piloting skills. I am not sure that is the case. While I hate the prospect of not flying the airplane, the pilot in this case clearly followed the checklist. If ever faced with the same circumstances, I anticipate similarly executing the checklist as published.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-11-04/walmart-ex-ceo-makes-emergency-parachute-landing-freeway
damonharvey
Damon Harvey 0
I would also add this,
unless you have spent a lot of time bumping around below 5000 ft in all kinds of wind and rain and low clouds, one might be more inclined to just pull the rip cord.
I have flown with some guys who think clouds and rain are like brick buildings, NEVER go near them! Which is nonsense. Its going to happen sometime so get used to the feeling and don't just push the panic button. Imagine this guy trying to fly in Alaska. He would never get off the ground! Or he would be burning 500lbs of fuel on every flight shooting 20 mile straight in ILSs, which by the way would limit him to about 14 airports in AK. The CEO types that have been flying in the back of G4s, might need to get some 'recurrent" before bumping around in the clouds. (Im sure someone will post that this guy has 20,0000 hours in a SuperCuB in Antarctica, sure)
jhjardine
jhjardine 1
Damon, so the fact that the "CEO type" pilot followed the Cirrus emergency checklist holds little weight from your perspective? Seems awfully presumptive to vilify the "CEO type" as a privileged idiot with not enough experience, knowledge or expertise. I am still not convinced that he did anything wrong here.
bentwing60
bentwing60 1
Not sure the more seasoned on this forum said he did. The perspective comes from an old LearJet flyin Luddite mentality. Mine! A lot has changed since I started to vote and it mattered! Weren't no CHUTES, and v-tail Bonanzas got the same number of rookies. He survived, as did his passenger. The only difference is the insurance rates.

Login

Don't have an account? Register now (free) for customized features, flight alerts, and more!
This website uses cookies. By using and further navigating this website, you accept this.
Dismiss
Did you know that FlightAware flight tracking is supported by advertising?
You can help us keep FlightAware free by allowing ads from FlightAware.com. We work hard to keep our advertising relevant and unobtrusive to create a great experience. It's quick and easy to whitelist ads on FlightAware or please consider our premium accounts.
Dismiss