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Video: A Sun Country Boeing 737-800 Gets a Fresh Paint Job

Submitted
This time-lapse from our friends at Jet Midwest offers a rare glimpse into the plane repainting process from start-to-finish. The clip begins with a Sun Country Boeing 737-800 (N804SY) landing at Kansas City International Airport. After a fast and furious time-lapse of less than five minutes, we witness what could easily be mistaken for a brand-new plane heading back to its home base in Minneapolis, MN (MSP). (www.airlinereporter.com) More...

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PhotoFinish
PhotoFinish 4
Shorter version of sun country paint job*:
http://www.rightthisminute.com/video/what-it-takes-paint-boeing-737-800-time-lapse

Painting of Southwest's Penguine ONE livery:
http://vimeo.com/m/69110670

* particularly helpful for those whose browsers that have issue with airlinereporter's video requirements, while on the go.
hamster1436
Hamster Vonk 3
Very cool. I can't figure out how to get an ink jet printer to print a t-shirt transfer correctly and these guys make all of that masking and layers look so easy.
Mungrel
James Ashurst 3
Good share, was interesting to watch.
KennyFlys
Ken Lane 2
Very cool!

I'd like to see the cost of just the paper,plastic and tape materials. That has to rival the income of one those workers.
medmond
Great share!
dfrossi
Excellent.
dtu
David Upton 1
So that's how it's done. Very interesting.
simshea
Looks to me like they stripped the original paint before the yellow primer. Even a dried coating is a significant load, don't double it!
KennyFlys
Ken Lane 2
They will just as we did in the Navy. That seemingly minor layer of paint can weigh several hundred pounds in an airliner. And, it does not have as good of bond as with a new coat on top of primer applied to a raw surface.

This also allows them to inspect the sheet metal for any signs of corrosion that might not be seen below the paint surface.

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