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  • 31

Delta to passengers: What do you want for your seat?

Submitted
NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Delta Air Lines has launched a system for travelers who are willing to get bumped from overbooked flights to auction their seats to the carrier. (money.cnn.com) More...

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dbaker
Daniel Baker 0
It really makes a lot of sense.
alwilson565
Alan Wilson 0
Hey here's and idea, why don't they sell the same amount of tickets as they have seats on the plane?
cbw
Collin White 0
They would be missing out on people wanting to give them money at that point! You think an airline is going to refuse money from the traveling public?
HunterTS4
Toby Sharp 0
cuz not everyone shows up for each flight
AccessAir
AccessAir 0
Well guess what?Whether everyone shows up or not, the seats are paid for as the tickets are non-refundable in most cases. So if they get a no-show, Delta has the opportunity to double sell that seat. In fact, now, if you dont cancel before flight time and no-show, the airline cancels the whole booking and keeps ALL of the money.....
Overbooking is passe with those new policies in place..The only airline that I know of that does not overbook is Allegiant Air....
Overbooking is just a vehicle to try and make extra money, but with the DBC vouchers they have to give out, they are giving money away...Whats the point?
Wingsofgold87
BRI CAM 0
You are obviously not a student of statistics, nor have you looked close enough at the voucher programs. Whether I might like it or not, I have a pretty close tie to the industry and the processes that takes place in booking. It makes financial sense to oversell and maximize profit by always having a full flight, even in the instances that vouchers have to be issued. Typically the aircraft is not in an oversold situation when vouchers are issued, but it is an aircraft, crew or weather issue that requires the extra compensation. The vouchers are only increased by one or two in the over booking situation. Furthermore, the people that use vouchers are restricted to certain flights and usually spend another 25-30% of their own money. So now they are flying on flights that would require little or no money to send them on, but they are using the vouchers (which in turn really costs the issuing airline nothing) and spending even more money with the airline! It really is a smart business decision and people are rarely displaced due directly to overbooking. Especially with all the big mergers, the airlines have been able to assign the right aircraft to the right routes based on loads, so overbooking is more of a non-issue than it was in the recent past.
Wingscrubber
Wingscrubber 0
http://www.dontflydelta.com/
http://www.deltareallysucks.com/
http://deltaisevil.blogspot.com/
http://dlsucks.blogspot.com/
It's called customer service, people. Get a clue!
indy2001
indy2001 0
It sounds to me like Delta is trying to undermine the Federal guidelines that mandate payments to passengers that are involuntarily bumped. They can dress it up as much as they like, but it is just a cheap ploy. My wife and I have often given up our seats voluntarily for people who needed them more (e.g. for family emergencies). But we wanted to actually see those people before making the decision. Delta's effort makes that impossible.

As far as overbooked flights, I AM a student of statistics. And earlier posters are correct. In this day of nonrefundable tickets, it is very unlikely for people to not show up. Although it is possible for connecting passengers to miss the flight, why in the world would originating flights (that fly INTO the hubs) need this kind of oversell? Many years ago, a person who absolutely had to fly could make reservations on a number of flights to the same destination to insure they had a seat. But security measures make that virtually impossible these days. Intentional overbooking is still greed, plain and simple.
redlegsfan21
Dan Betts 0
Yet people still don't show up with non-refundable tickets. We've had Dayton to Atlanta flights (MD-88s; 142 seats) oversold by 7 and still have 5 seats empty when the flight goes out. This doesn't undermine the Federal guidelines for Involuntary Denied Boarding because the regulations just say that we are required to ask for volunteers before denying anyone. We just pushed this off from the gate agent to the kiosk. The system is the exact same as Northwest used except the maximum amount to bid is $400 unlike the $300 max Northwest gave out.

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