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  • 25

Congress negotiates supersonic commercial flights over the U.S territory

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The commercial supersonic flight over the U.S. soil has been banned since 1978, but Congress might remove or mitigate the constraints. (airlinerwatch.com) More...

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nasdisco
Chris B 6
Wonder if Boeing or Gulfstream is behind this.
chalet
chalet 3
Hard as they might try, there are certain physics laws that can not be modified. If a body pierces the space at Mach 2, 3, etc. and at FL500 or 600, a reaction in the opposite direction and of the same force will affect the body (Newton 3 law) and the result will be that the body hitting the molecules will produce a boom which is annoying as hell. Simply as that. Mark my words.
jet4ang
jet4ang 1
True but they're working on spreading these molecules out with body configurations so the boom isn't like a lightning bolt, rather a thump.
Gentilo
Andrea Gentilini 1
NASA is already testing "quiet boom" aircrafts. I hope that the era of supersonic travelling would come back soon, I'm longing to get aboard of one of these planes.
paulgilpin1953
paul gilpin 0
The U.S. Congress could reauthorize the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) to set federal and international policies, regulations, and standards

well, the FAA has the authority to set international policies. good to know.

and before you SJW to all alex jones on me. the article did not say that by their influence, numerous other countries adopt and recognize the authority of the FAA. the article said, the FAA will set international policy.

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