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  • 27

A look back at 25 years of the Hubble Space Telescope

Submitted
It was a much different time when the Hubble Space Telescope took off aboard the space shuttle Discovery on this day in 1990. But much like how we've ditched our Umbros for Under Armour and traded our slap bracelets for Apple Watches, Hubble has come a long way since then. (www.theverge.com) More...

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kd5byb
kd5byb 2
Hubble is one of the wonders of the last 30 years, IMHO. Of course, I'm biased, my father helped fabricate the mirrors at Perkin-Elmer. He was so happy when it launched...then so depressed when it wasn't perfect. Yet...even with the spherical aberration, it still did great science that only got better with the "glasses" that corrected the spherical aberration.

I find it sad that NASA is but a shell of its former great self.

On the other hand, NASA has always been about developing technology...and not so good about operating / maintaining technology. (I worked Shuttle and Station for about 5 years out of college at Johnson...and had a front-row seat to some of NASA's warts in operations.)

I do hope that some of the smaller, newer, more agile corporations like SpaceX can take over and further develop America's space technology.
AlBauer
Al Bauer 1
Absolutely Fantastic, I can find no other words.
speedbird9
Marty Martino 1
Concur. I'm just saddened there won't be a vehicle to go up and bring it home when it's finally done (as opposed to crashing it in the ocean - like they're not polluted enough).
kwu20001
kev wu 1
I'd expect a majority of the spacecraft to burn up as it reenters the atmosphere... although some pieces of it may survive reentry but some small pieces
speedbird9
Marty Martino 1
I agree. And I believe that NASA expects it do so (in fact, I believe that when it's finally done, it's supposed to close the eye and deliberately dive into the atmosphere). I just wish there was a vehicle - an improved orbiter that could go up, get it and bring it home (and could deliver the James Webb Telescope to its parking spot as well).
kwu20001
kev wu 1
Thats my wish as well. Sad to see the shuttle retired but maybe SpaceX or Boeing can find a way to get it down for NASA.

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