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  55 Votes (4.69 Average) and 6,019 Views  

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Avro 696 Shackleton (N790WL)

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Pima Air & Space Museum

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greg presley
That is one ugly plane!
Gilles Lavoie
What's the purpose of this plane ?
michael cowhey
submarine detection
Dennis Bisson
This is a MK 2. The MK 3 had nose gear and a viper jet engine in each of the outboard nacelles. These were used for takeoff and low altitude flight at heavy weights or when one of the Griffin engines failed. I flew a little over 1000 hrs on MK2 & MK3 as a Canadian while on exchange with the RAF in the late 60s.
Daniel Gless
Whatever the designer of that plane was smoking I WANT SOME! Butt UGLY!
Greg Byington
That's a nice shot, zfwaviation! If anyone is interested, there are more pics on FA posted under the Reg Num and also under the Serial Num. I have mine posted under the SN.

And here is more information from the PASM website:

AVRO AEW.2 SHACKLETON

Manufacturer: AVRO
Markings: Royal Air Force, Number 8 Squadron, RAF Station Lossiemouth, 1991
Designation: AEW.2
Registration: N790WL
Serial Number: WL790

Soon after the end of World War II the Royal Air Force issued a requirement for a new four-engine long range maritime patrol plane to replace its American made Liberators and Fortresses. The AVRO company responded with a new design based on the Lincoln bomber. The aircraft used the Lincoln's wings and landing gear as well as parts from the earlier Lancaster bomber but with a shorter fuselage and higher powered Rolls-Royce Griffon engines driving six-blade counter rotating propellers. The new design was named Shackleton after the famous British explorer and entered service in February 1951. Beginning in 1971 ten Shackleton MR.2s were modified into Airborne Early Warning aircraft by the addition of radar systems and domes removed from the Fairey Gannet. These aircraft served with the RAF until 1991 when the last of them were retired.
Specifications

Wingspan: 120 ft
Length: 87 ft 4 in
Height: 17 ft 6 in
Max. Speed: 300 mph
Service Ceiling: 20,200 feet
Range: 3,660 miles
Engines: 4 Rolls-Royce Griffon Mk. 58 with 2,450 horsepower each
Crew: 10
Jesse Carroll
Great photo, however, one UGLY BRICK with wings!
dekock
Ugly perhaps, but no better sound flying overhead. With those 4 Rolls Royce engines it’s like 4 P51 Mustangs passing overhead in a close formation. Grew up listening to those. Add to that the sound of 4 contra rotating props and suddenly it’s far from ugly.
Michael Wulfsohn
First pic I've seen of this aircraft. Interesting. It definitely isn't much for looks, and makes the A-10 look like a beauty queen!
Pat Leeds
To extreme right with orange nose, you'll see a Douglas C-133B, A/C 0527 that I spent many hours on as Loadmaster with the 84th ATS at Travis AFB in the late 1950's, early 1960s. Only 50 produced by Douglas. 25 at Travis and 25 to Dover AFB. Interesting read about the bird. By Cal Taylor:
Remembering An Unsung Giant - The Douglas C-133 Cargomaster and Its People by Cal Taylor (2007-02-05)
Of the 25 at Travis our Squadron lost 4 due to various crashes and disappearances
fholbert
Something about that plane reminds me of my first girl friend.
CLARENCE HELLER
Never mind what it looks like! What a thing to maintain and fly.It did it's job...
C.W. Reed
I agree with Clarence! There is a reason they were kept in service until 1991!!
jhayes66
Function over Fashion!
Robert Mott
Love the photo, pleased it is out of the yard as it was away from display on my last visit. I worked on the avionics of the maritime version 1958 to 1961 in the Mediterranean. Ugly or not it was a brilliant design, and knocked the spots off the Neptune it replaced any day, any weather. The wings were designed for low level flight [sometimes there was salt on the props we had to clean off. Unlike the photo, our crew chief would not let us walk away from this aircraft until the props were lined up. Thanks for trip down memory lane.
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