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Squawks & HeadlinesFlying in Thick Clouds with a Dead Engine…

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Flying in Thick Clouds with a Dead Engine…

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Like most pilots wanting to make flying their career in life, the hardest thing is to build time in their logbook. Fortunately, I was very lucky and had parents that paid for me to just fly and build time. I had just got my Private Single & Multiengine Instrument ratings, trying to build time for my Commercial license. As with most young pilot’s, I was invincible, or so I thought. It started with my girlfriend at the time wanting to fly to Disney World in Orlando FL. So we set out from NE…

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Billb2001
Bill Baird 4
The process of learning safe flying is the same as learning medicine. I have done both. It is one on one sharing of wisdom and lessons learned the hard way from the more experienced and skilled with the less experienced and skilled. Unlike engineering for example it cannot be strictly gotten from a book. Anyone who thinks that they know it all or considers someone older and more experienced somehow a dinosaur and out of touch is arrogant. Arrogance will kill you. Especially in aviation.

It is said that in medicine we bury our mistakes. In aviation we get buried because of our mistakes. It is an irrefutable fact of the profession.

In those early years as a pilot, it took a while for the youthful me to get over myself. There I was, twenty one years old, flying for an airline and puffed up like a preening peacock. That did not last long under the scrutiny of the old Captains I flew with.

The three words that have saved my bacon many times over are, "I don't know". Then and only then was I able to absorb the lessons so freely shared by the more experienced to fill those gaps in my knowledge.

If I had a co-pilot who knew all the answers (ex fighter jocks were the worst) I would quietly give them all of rope they needed to hang themselves. It was fun to watch the reactions of someone who ran out of airspeed, altitude and ideas all at once. It became one of those AHA moments.

We are never too skilled to be unable to learn something new.
james801
James Farnsworth 1
Now days some think I don't know stands for I will get caned or look dumb.
The only bad question is one not asked...

Thanks for reading and voting.
Fly Safe !!
james801
James Farnsworth 6
I hope all of you like it and feel free to give me your suggestions as to what kind of things you want to see on FA.

Fly safe!!
Musketeer1
Musketeer1 9
More stories like these. Even if they are second hand from friends or strangers. I like these because they are like "Never again" or "I learned about flying from" type articles. Good start and keep it up.
jshhmr
josh homer 4
Articles like yours are perfect for those like me. I'll be getting my Sport license in March, but have been reading articles like yours, as we'll as tons of stuff from AOPA's training magazine for we'll over a decade. I thank people like you with actual experience, because it helps my knowledge and confidence. It's why I joined FA to begin with.
atsdroid
Andrew Skretvedt 3
Ditto the previous comments. Very much enjoyed!

It's interesting to me in how many similar sorts of stories (where something goes wrong in IMC), the ostensibly well-trained IFR pilot cannot seem to keep enough basic instrument flying skill together to keep from losing control. You got through it, although you didn't get the precision you would have liked. My overriding thought from the "jumpseat" in your story was: "What if he cannot stabilize and has to go around, is he ready to handle that?"

Available training topics are far more numerous than most pilots' time and budget. One risk in standardization may be that the last incident to get attention refocuses training too much onto an aspect that might realistically be further down the priority scale if considered in perspective.

Good skills foundation frees you to start doing what you know you can do, while you work out what the priorities are. Working the priorities by applying your skill foundation minimizes the consequences of the situation, and in turn improves probabilities at each step for a better outcome.

I think that training should make flying intuitive for the pilot, not an excercise in executing a pre-scripted procedure. What do you really know about what you're doing if you depend that much on your checklist? It's an important aid, but more like an executive secretary that reminds the CEO of his appointments, while he's focused on the strategy.Your experience teaches that keeping a sharp foundation of basic flying skills will serve any pilot when non-normal situations themselves prove to be "non-normal"; when the checklist doesn't go there, and you have to make one up.

Your foundation also helped to highlight what later skill-building might serve you best in the future. Sharing the story allows hangar-fliers not to have to have your experience in order to reap the benefit of the lesson.


(TL;DR;OT - I once watched a fabulous old video from ITVV documenting flight deck ops on the Concorde during a NY-London flight (Google "ITVV Concorde"). During cruise there was some presentation about checklists and non-normals. Much attention had to be paid at all times to fuel balance for proper CG. The checklists on that bird where some of the most lengthy bricks of paper I've ever seen. It became clear to me that if the stuff ever did hit the fan on Concord, just trying to properly run the checklists would become its own safety risk.

The recent Quantas A380 uncontained engine failure represents a modern iteration of this problem. It worked out for them, but I was deeply troubled by the length of time the crew seemed to be required to spend to properly consider all the fault messages and action checklists. I worry that at some point, a stricken but still landable aircraft might be doomed to catastrophe because its crew took too long actioning checklists or considering fault messages that really amounted to distractors. Intuition rooted on sound basic flying skills and a thorough knowledge of the aircraft, could help suggest to captains what the really important priorities are, and what stuff may be left out unless or until resources to consider it become available.)
preacher1
preacher1 2
Just as an added note to the 380 engine failure, by their own words, if there had not been 5 senior Captains on that flight they would not have made it. 3 were kept busy just running checklists and going thru the various bells & whistles while 2 had their hands full just flying the plane. You have to know what you are doing and how to fly the plane. No amount of checklisting in the world could have been written for such a happening. Only by experience did that bird get safely down
james801
James Farnsworth 1
Thanks for you kind response. Had I not been able to see the runway when I did I would have had to go around. And with the prop just wind milling it would have made for a very slow climb. I got lucky. Not with thousands of hours under me in big iron 76 & 77 and the chance to have had more in-depth training on things I still feel I have a lot to learn.
If we don’t help each other as a whole, not just as pilots but as people we are doom to fail. Now days you see people not want to teach others what he or she may know or have experienced because of fear they may get passed up by the younger ones. But the fact is the older teacher will always be the teacher so long as they keep learning. I have learned a ton from younger pilots.

Like I told a guy at Flight Aware when he was proof reading this article “I program FMS not MS Word” then I went to my 14 year old son for help. And there has been a bunch of airline crashes over the years due to checklist. In the airlines they teach us “Drills” for each problem that way no matter who you fly with the Capt & FO know what to do then confirm it was done correct with the QRH or check list.

Fly Safe!!
preacher1
preacher1 2
There is always that PASS BY scare/thought and it depends on the security/insecurity of the older person. I heard it said best one time when older brother/younger brother were arguing about who was the best pilot and both were AA Captains. Older brother finally said " I taught you everything you know but I didn't teach you everything I know". We can always learn.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
I love that and can't wait to use it on my grown sons.
akayemm
Er.A.K. Mittal 1
Dear friend preacher1, about teaching-learning there is an interesting quote.
' I do not remember what I was taught, but I remember what I learnt. '
And those who follow this, keep on learning for ever, from every one who so ever.
And end up wiser than most.
akayemm
Er.A.K. Mittal 1
Dear friend James Farnsworth, regarding teaching-learning attitudes, the problem is simple. Once a teacher always a teacher. And in each one of us there is a hidden teacher waiting to come out.
If some one is hesitant or reluctant to teach, it can be due many reasons. Mainly, as I see it, teaching a large class is easier than teaching a very small class.
And irony is that teaching an art like flying is by and large 1 to 1 affair. Hence the teacher is substantially limited by the attitude of the learner. and that is where your expression comes.
As I said above, a teacher will keep on teaching. The tempo and enthusiasm may vary from time to time, from place to place. Always dependant on the pupils involved.
DerekCooks
Derek Thomas 1
Had an interesting conversation with a retired AA pilot at our annual neighborhood gathering. He came up "the hard way" back in the day when - regardless of how many hours you came in with - you flew FE first (In TW Connies, then 70's), then FO, and THEN Captain. HATED "big iron" - "It's just sitting there watching the sky go by" - and always bid on the MD-80 short-hop routes. "I wanted to FLY the damn airplane." Laughed about new FO's he was training who, after the 3rd or 4th hop of the day wondered if they were done yet. "Nope."...
bettiem
bettiem 1
Great article. Thank you. The way you wrote it, I was with you all the way. As for the EX-girlfriend, that's all for the best.
murrayhill3
Jim Murray 3
While learning to fly I was taught how to crab an airplane. It saved my life one day when I was shooting touch and goes in an Aeronca Champ. Turning left after takeoff at 400 ft., I glanced to my left and saw a squall line moving across the field. A wall of water! I banked quickly left, pushed the nose down and crabbed steeply to get on the ground. The rain hitting the windshield blinded me so I slid open the side window to see. I made it, but it scared me. I don't think I had accumulated more than thirty hours in total.
shellyxd
shellyxd 3
"Just a few words you remember might save you one day"...too true. Listening to the older guys is definitely an acquired skill for some of us young guns (unfortunately). The key is to have an inherent respect for those individuals (older, younger, shouldn't matter) who have lived to tell those certain, chill-inducing tales, and to have the open mind to learn from them.
preacher1
preacher1 3
This reinforces the "No old, bold, pilots" saying. I've got right at 40 years behind me and if I don't learn something from a flight or conversation, it was a wasted trip. Like James, you never quit learning.

James, a good combination of bad personal experience and a solution. Hopefully it will put everyone thinking. Good job and Blue Skies today
preacher1
preacher1 3
Sad part is that most, and I say MOST, don't want to listen these days. There is a know it all attitude amongst some. I can remember in my service days when a young 2nd Lt.would come in out of OTS. The ones that listened to their NCO's and enlisted guys were the ones that went on up the rank ladder fast. Then there were those that said, "I got my bars and I'm your boss". You let them kind hang themselves. As you quoted about those "few words", they might make the difference in whether you get one down in one piece or EMS picking you up off the runway or some other place.
sparkie624
sparkie624 3
Preacher... Are you old or bold... You know age is all relative.
preacher1
preacher1 3
As we grow older we get like him. We start realizing that we may not be bulletproof. LOL Hey, I'm gonna send you an FB msg in a minute about that computer memory.
james801
James Farnsworth 3
He just old :-)
preacher1
preacher1 3
Yeah but I can remember in my younger days of making a 707 do things it weren't supposed to do, making a Winnebago drive like a vette, but I beat wx out of town and stayed on schedule. Only time I ever got to tell the boss to sit down, buckle up, and shut up. LOL
jshhmr
josh homer 2
Well let me apologize on behalf of my generation. For some reason, my generation thinks that the experienced people in life have no valid opinion, or have anything to teach. They are wrong. Especially when it comes to flying, and real tangible things like flying are an invaluable resource to more experienced people.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 2
Many companies have awoken and begun rehiring retirees because those people have knowledge the next generation simply doesn't nor can find in books. It takes experience and then passing along that experience to those just coming up. Book learning is vital but nothing is so vital as having been there and sharing those nuggets of knowledge. There's nowhere anyone can go to learn things like this story posted by Mr. Farnsworth. We may continue to progress as time goes on, but conversely we continue to lose so many skills that cannot be found written anywhere. Look to the past to find your way in the future.
preacher1
preacher1 2
In the past 6 months, I hired 3 and all of them, while well hours and experienced, expressed a strong desire to learn more. I got 1, possibly 2 more to hire and train and I hope I am that fortunate. Our company has a heritage of guys like that and we hope it can continue.
preacher1
preacher1 1
Josh: there is no apology necessary. While you might like to, you cannot be responsible for the negative actions of many. You can spread the word among your peers that they might do well to listen and ask questions, but once you have done that, the rest is up to them. Kinda like leading the horse to water but you can't make him drink. We all have individual choices to make, and I guarantee you that if you live long enough, you will make a few bad ones. They call it school of hard knocks and experience.
jshhmr
josh homer 2
You're absolutely right. The hardest question humans face is the purpose of it all. I personally think the purpose is to learn, and we cannot learn as long as we ignore past generations, the ones with valuable information. I only have to guess this is a result of an instant gratification generation. You were raised when information was not as available. You were informed by great men like Kronkite etc. Now it's all propaganda. This is why I think my generation has such a cynical view.
preacher1
preacher1 1
I understand where you are coming from. Kinda like not reading the Old Testament in the Bible, You really can't see where you're going if you don't know where you've been. I think the instant gratification and communication might play a big part in it. When you think that CNN is only 26 years old now and how many people we have at that age and under, they have never known a world without it. We didn't even have a computer in the house until the mid 90's and living where we do in the county, we had dial up until about 3 years ago, when DSL finally made it's way out here. With the 24 hr news, we knew when Sadam Hussein had a loose bowel movement
james801
James Farnsworth 1
Josh,
Preacher1 said what i would have. Only person you can control is you.And you sound like you are above most. Keep it up...

Thanks for Reading & Voting

Fly Safe!!
akayemm
Er.A.K. Mittal 1
Dear friends shellyxd and preacher1, how right you both are. What you stated is true for every profession, no exceptions. Ironically, it happens during every generation, in some form or the other. And in every pack there are guys(gals included) who follow the old school of thought and learn well. Part of the remaining ones learn from experience and come back to the 'coffee table' for lessons. And those who continue to be on the high ground , fail to rise and grow.
This portal is also one similar 'coffee table'. For fliers and some non fliers too. Correct me if I am wrong !
preacher1
preacher1 2
There may be hope for you yet. LOL
akayemm
Er.A.K. Mittal 1
Why me alone, my friend preacher1 ? There is hope for every one, you included. You are not hopeless either. LOL !
preacher1
preacher1 2
Well, you are finally starting to understand what this forum is all about, not just speculation but theories offered that are gained from experience. Some good but some shot down based on other's experience.
akayemm
Er.A.K. Mittal 1
ThanX my friend preacher1. My problem is that many of my friends 'refuse' to see or gauge my views based on my varied experience in the proper light. For them a non flier like me is incapable to comment or give opinions, rationally, what ever his(my) qualifications and experience be ! Where as my EVERY comment is accompanied by logic and reasons as I see them. But people respond without responding to the rationale given !
And that's the precise problem I have to combat with ! Sadly :-(
ThanX again.
preacher1
preacher1 3
Well, that is not a trait that is common to this group of people and is totally out of context to some of their talking in this forum and is taken by some, at times, as a restriction on their views, when, in effect, you may be saying the same thing. The fact that you are a non aviator just adds to that and casts the impression that you are downgrading them and not knowing what you are talking about, hence the ridicule.
akayemm
Er.A.K. Mittal 1
ThanX my friend preacher1. Not reading fully, that is my grouse ! Attack me and my rationale together. Or as we say in legal system , any judgement without reasons will be held ultra vires the basic principles of natural justice and fair trial.
Without meaning to be too boastful , I am aware that the kind of multiplicity of professions that I carry is not very common, not even in my country where multiple qualifications are very common due to high degree of competition.
Any way, I try to take it in my stride.
preacher1
preacher1 2
10-4. LOL
patjschmidt
Patrick Schmidt 1
When you say crabbed to get down, do you mean forward slipped?

In the parlance I have heard in my training, crabbing is to offset the wind in order to maintain ground track.
james801
James Farnsworth 1
Thats one of them what if's most don't think about till it happens. Good job!! I am sure it made you a better pilot too.

Fly Safe!!
CaptainFreedom
CaptainFreedom 5
There's nothing like having a passenger yelling "Help! We're going to crash" 2 feet away from you as you attempt to calmly assess and take action. That's probably more streeful than what you described in the article :)
james801
James Farnsworth 3
You should have seen me trying to get her in that 172 the next day!!! But I guess the bus was the worse so she got in and came home.

I was talking to an old CFI one day that said he had a guy lock up on the controls in stall training so bad he had to punch the guy to get him to let go.

Thanks for reading and voting

Fly Safe!!
akayemm
Er.A.K. Mittal 0
Dear friend Jonathan Fischbach what James Farnsworth has successfully NOT described is how much was this flight a factor for Y the current GF became X ?
;p !
akayemm
Er.A.K. Mittal 1
minor correction
for ' Y the current GF became ... '
please read ' Y the THEN current GF became ...... '
My apologies
JimHeslop
Jim Heslop 2
Wow! This sent a shiver up my spine as I read it. The scenario you just explained is very simular to a King Air 100 that crashed at CYVR a couple years ago. An oil leak left engine, they reduced the power to it, according to the proceedure it was not required to be shut down as they still had sufficient oil pressure.
Returning to airport their approach speed dropped below their target so additional power was added apparently to the right engine. With the windmilling left prop and the drag it created, this power on the right engine quickly caused a sudden yaw to the left and down they went!
They almost got it straighted out but ran out of airspace and crash landed on a major roadway. The plane burst into flames and the quick thinking public managed to pull everyone out except the two pilots. Unfortunately they both died from their injuries :(
The Capt had somewhere around 12000 hrs.
My heart really goes out to their families. They damn near pulled it out of trouble!
LarryQB
LarryQB 2
Consider the SwissAir MD-11 that crashed off Newfoundland. They had smoke in the cabin and in the cockpit overhead from a fire apparently caused by a failed entertainment system. They delayed their emergency landing to dump fuel down to the maximum authorized landing weight... and the plane became unflyable in the meantime. Too much following procedures didn't help there.

One day I was flying a Falcon 2000EX into Eagle (EGE), Colorado when the cabin went IFR in blue smoke. The book procedure would have been to successively turned off each A/C pack in turn to determine which one was putting out bad air. That would be a fine procedure if you have no place to go quickly, but in our case we were on a five minute final for the runway, so we simply turned off both packs. Although not the approved checklist procedure it was appropriate given the circumstances. Sometimes ya gotta do whatcha gotta do.
vtc12ip
Towney Sausville 2
As a qualifier, I soloed in 1968 and have been paid to fly ever since. Right now my job is to teach helicopter pilots how to become fixed wing pilots. Sounds easy, well... Every two weeks I get two new students and introduce them to a King Air 200. The last two students I had were both long time helicopter pilots. One was a CW4 and the other a LTC. Both have been flying the Blackhawk for more than 15 years. The first day, I told them flying an airplane was very different from a helicopter and I was going to push their comfort zone. Both of them looked at me with skepticism. Remember they were both experienced pilots.

After several days, it was very obvious old habits were dying hard. The standard answer when something didn't go right was "well in the Blackhawk...". My answer was "look at the prop, it is vertical not horizontal". Neither expected it to be so hard. Both were very focused on procedural stuff and not flying the airplane. Give them a problem a bit out of step with a procedure would result in troubleshooting the problem and not flying the airplane.

I am a firm believer in you, as a pilot, should always know where the airplane is and where it (and you) are going and what is it going to take to get you there. And always be ready for the what ifs. But first and foremost, fly the airplane. I think I got that through to my students, but it took a bit of pushing.
plk304
Poloko Nyambe 2
The CN235 S300M put a combination of both in a full flight simulator. He mad me fly several circuits on IMC. Then the next he induce an engine failure. At the end of it all it had taxed me more than 12-hr flight in blue sky.
to sleep the moment I got to the hotel room.
Well done.
james801
James Farnsworth 1
What did that end up being?

Thannks for Reading & Voting

Fly Safe!!
preacher1
preacher1 1
Checklists and all the QRH is nice but as you say, you got to know how to FLY YOUR PLANE.
Billb2001
Bill Baird 1
Fly the ariplane should be the first item in every abnormal procedure. That simple concept gets all to easily lost in the maze of of complex procedures and demands of technical knowledge of aircraft operations. As aircraft get more complex and abnormal procedures get lengthier the crew (both one and two man) can get overwhelmed. It is not a new problem but has been around forever. It became a focal point in sim and flight training changes in the wake of Eastern Airlines 401 crash into the Everglades in 1972. Four qualified crewmembers in the cockpit of a perfectly good L1011 became so engrossed in troubleshooting a burned out green and locked nose gear indicator light bulb that the airplane was allowed to descend into the ground while on autopilot. This certainly was not the first time such a thing had happened and unfortunately was not the last but it was one of the ugliest and most blatent examples of what happens when flying the machine first and foremost gets forgotten in the chaos and confusion of even a minor inflight problem.
LarryQB
LarryQB 1
The right engine had a cracked fitting which allowed engine oil to enter the A/C system. Luckily the event occurred in good weather, daylight, and close to the intended destination. The caper wouldn't have been as much fun had it happened at altitude and at night when we might have been halfway across the Atlantic.

The engine was changed by a SWAT team and we flew the plane back home a week later.
james801
James Farnsworth 1
Who was the guy that ran out of gas up north try n to fix a gear light?
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 1
Was that dudes name Wayne?
LarryQB
LarryQB 1
1978, United Airlines, Portland OR:

http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2008569503_webaccident29m.html

The Captain held so long trying to burn off fuel in anticipation of a landing gear problem on landing that he ran out of fuel. The F/O and F/E had mentioned the fuel state but were ignored. This accident is considered the "father of CRM" training.
james801
James Farnsworth 1
Eagle is not an APP you can goof off on then you add the problem you had.Yep little less seat left after you got up :-)
james801
James Farnsworth 1
No this was an airline crash. He held trying to fix it and ran out of gas. the FO & FE let him. I will dig up what flight it was later.
preacher1
preacher1 1
It may have been but it wasn't this Wayne.LOL
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 1
Yeah I thought he was pointing to you...
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 2
So the ex is the current...
james801
James Farnsworth 3
No she still an Ex got her a new man long time ago. But my wife talks to her some.
akayemm
Er.A.K. Mittal 1
Dear friend James Farnsworth, how much responsible was this eventful flight in the conversion process, from current to ex ? ;-)
All said, even for a non flier like me your narration gives a good lesson which can be applied to all other fields too ! Including every day life.
Great article.
Current and ex talk to each other ! OMG. Be on guard my friend. :p
preacher1
preacher1 1
Blue skies across the pond
james801
James Farnsworth 1
They not so blue today.
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 1
In London?
james801
James Farnsworth 1
yep. pond has some non blue skys today.lol
preacher1
preacher1 1
That's what it sounds like but I haven't gotten that out of him yet either. LOL
preacher1
preacher1 1
Check your FA message block. I just sent you something
bjohnson09
Bryce Johnson 1
I think there is much to learn from all ages of pilots. Procedural wise...I don't think there are many better to talk to than CFIs (especially on instrument matters). In terms of weather avoidance and handling emergencies, you have to go to the experienced, older pilots. We all bring something to the table...with technology advancing so much in aviation, the younger guys really bring something to the table along with the older guys providing that "What if" experience. Fortunately, the Captain I fly with has that experience and has passed on much of his experience (he is also a NATA recognized CFI with 10,000+ hours of dual given and an additional 15,000+ in other flying)...but until you experience it, its only a "what if". As he always says, never be satisfied...stay ahead of the airplane!
wehage65
Yowza, love, love, love flying, never had any desire to pilot a plane, this reinforces my feelings. Glad you're okay, thanks for sharing.
stormie
Norman Barry 1
Thanks for sharing this experience ! It reminds me of a couple Humbling experiencex I have had. One in wx like you and another doing a back course ILS one engine out emergency AND a single engine Amphibian engine failure dead in middle of high, treacherous mountain range in strong winds. Like you, after surviving all, Tons of practice ice ensued afterwards ! All the best. NCB
matscom
Robert Mathews 1
Thanks for sharing that experience. I've never flown a twin, but in my single-engine days I remember logging more flights as a confidence booster and I agree...listening to other pilots is "heads up".
Bob Mathews in San Jose
rickascott
rick SCOTT 1
James, I too had an engine failure in a 310. It's been a long time ago, but I think that with that engine you had to feather quickly because it uses engine oil. My cylinder departed the airplane so I lost oil pressure very quickly but when I realized what it was, I feathered right away. Meanwhile, if anybody ever finds a 310 cylinder in Detroit, I would like to have it back!
rickascott
rick SCOTT 1
No single engine ILS? What did you do in training?
sledogpilot
Duane Mader 1
Why did the prop not feather?
A twin has props set up to "fail safe", in other words a combination of centrifugal twisting moment, spring or counterweight force should drive it towards feather. A single engine plane's prop drives it toward flat in the event of loss of oil pressure so you have some power. I would check to make sure that the gov has full travel and if it does is it ok? Sludged up prop or crankshaft?
Good job flying, when teaching in the 310 we used to do an L/D demo where you set up at best L/D speed (120 mph I think) in stable level flight and then introduce drag producers. After each drag producer you would descend to maintain 120 mph and note the VSI. Full flaps were the worst, 1200 fpm down or so, a windmilling engine was second and produced about 800 fpm down.
cssimms
Stan Simms 1
Great info - well written and usable info!
Thanks
daveblevins52
Dave Blevins 1
Thank you for that story James. I will relate one later when I have more time. Good job.
abuelouwe1
abuelouwe1 1
Stories like yours, are the best training you may have, and give away to others. Thanks to the almighty that it have not be worse. Like, it could happen to the other engine at the same time, because it is part of the being of those old engines,as you say. How ever , it is the first time I hear about this failure in this plane. I have done a few flight with it and never worried about this failure.
The question is, why it was not replaced properly at review at the inspection time. Manufacturers know that, so it should have been in the list to replace. Or not?. Congratulations.
twincessna
william koehler 1
Excellent learning tool, did not understand the loss of lift on the engine out side or dip.
Bushbunnie
Julien Chartier 1
Very good, thank you
ualiah
Peter Crew 1
My son in an aviation program here in H town,,,first solo today! After he comes down from cloud 9, Ill have him read this.....Thanks for a great article!
hk119
horace sawyer 1
I'm glad you wrote that up James.
james801
James Farnsworth 2
Very true.

Remember to Vote on the Squawk when you read them thumbs up or down.

Fly Safe!!
PhotoFinish
PhotoFinish 1
"Oh look here, George. I found us a nice piece of metal for scrapping. We're gonna eat today."
sledogpilot
Duane Mader 1
There is no requirement to do a SE approach with a windmilling prop. Many light twins will barely fly with one feathered. As I said in an earlier post the reason for the prop not feathering should be found and fixed.
rickascott
rick SCOTT 1
Zero thrust approaches is what I had to do. Requirements or not, it save me in Detroit in 1989, 600 OVC and 7 miles. Still looking for the cylinder. see above
preacher1
preacher1 1
He told me earlier "on the 310 the mounting bracket for the oil cooler also holds the clip for the cable for the prop control. When the oil cooler snapped it flopped back and put about an inch of slack in the cable."
james801
James Farnsworth 1
Whay would it be a Zero Thurst app? And twin can fly on just one side running.
sledogpilot
Duane Mader 1
Thanks, that 'splains it.
sledogpilot
Duane Mader 1
I think rick meant on the simulated failed engine. Instructor pilots simulate a feathered engine by "zero thrust". FAA would like to have all simulated failures below 3000 AGL done by pulling the throttle. After the student performs the engine out procedure up to feathering the appropriate engine he says "feather left" or "feather right" the power is brought back up on the throttle just to the point that the RPM matches the operating engine.
This is approximately where the prop is just pulling itself through the air, simulating feathering.
As I said, good job. The drag on a windmilling engine is quite significant and with a lesser light twin than the 310 or a heavy load it still may not have flown. I like your attitude, all experienced pilots have had a few times when they realized they were just plain lucky.

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james801
James Farnsworth 5
No not a rich kid. I have worked since 14 and will till ????
Musketeer1
Musketeer1 2
I think he's referring to the "my parents paid for everything" part. I empathize with wtf because I had to do it all on my own and I'll be paying for it for the length of my career. I disagree with wtf because he is resentful like a wall street protester, whereas I am just flat jealous! Thanks for the good story, and shame on you for having parents that love you and want your dreams to come true!
Moviela
Ric Wernicke 1
My folks paid too, but a Cessna was $6 hr/wet.
james801
James Farnsworth 2
Now days 160 wet is good lol

They paid for it but i also worked for no paycheck for them from 13-18 and still never get paid to fly them :-)
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 1
Damn, you all are old, it was $45 an hour for me!!!
Musketeer1
Musketeer1 1
Well that sounds like a loan that was repaid to me man. And you better never charge them!
james801
James Farnsworth 2
Its kind of nice to be able to repay for the life we have. More so now that dads in bad health. I am very lucky to have them and my family on the same farm. That is until they fill my kids full of sugar and send then back to my house...
sparkie624
sparkie624 0
You expecting a long life Methuselah. Seeing that in a wild card means one number to each question mark... LOL "????"
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 1
Where did you pull that from???