• Join FlightAware (Why Join?)
  • Login
  • US Flag 
03:04AM EDT


 

Airport Tracker/Info


-or-


 

Squawks & HeadlinesUnited Airlines' plane grounded at Mumbai airport

Back to Squawk list

United Airlines' plane grounded at Mumbai airport

Submitted
NEW DELHI: A Boeing 777 aircraft of American carrier United Airlines was grounded at Mumbai airport last night after engineers found that its right engine cover was badly damaged, official sources said today. The aircraft, operating flight UA-48 from Newark to Mumbai, arrived around 2200 hours yesterday and the engineers found the right-side engine cowl badly damaged, the sources said. Cowl is the cover of an aircraft engine. Read more at:… (economictimes.indiatimes.com) More...

Sort type: [Top] [Newest]


joelwiley
joel wiley 2
Awaiting posting of damage photos with bated breath. Till then ....
delravi
zx zczc 0
Here we go again. The typical game of one-upmanship that seems to sprout every time such incidents occur. More often than not, its the media which is the culprit, making suggestive comments and insinuations where perhaps so such notions exist.

Frightening here is the fact that genuine and unbiased investigations get hampered in the flurry of media-whipped storms which rage around some inconsequential situations.

The primary thrust here is to make a thorough investigation into the cause or reasons behind the damage by which advisories, where and if required, are sent out to ensure further incidents can be either managed or avoided.

Irrespective of which country or authority is involved and what the background is to any current distrust, if at all, the investigations must be allowed to proceed without hindrance of any kind.

So there...
delravi
zx zczc 0
Yes, correct, authorities would not routinely inspect an airliner unless there has been a cause to do so.

In this case, the damage was noticed and perhaps based on the severity, it was escalated to the authorities which I feel is a perfectly normal thing to do.

While I agree with your entitlement to your opinion,coloring an incident like this in cultural hues based on presumptions is uncalled for.

delravi
zx zczc 0
Well, buddy, we could go on like this all day long but since neither of us were there on the spot, it's futile to keep badgering on.

I am sure the problem would be resolved to the satisfaction of all stakeholders as it should be.

Lets be thankful it was noticed in time and pre-empted any untoward incident at a later stage.
delravi
zx zczc 0
Really perplexed by the usage of the word 'oversight' being used so often in regulatory related matters.

Oversight is a noun meaning an unintentional failure to notice or do something.

The root word 'oversee' meaning to supervise cannot become 'oversight' to express jurisdictional control. It should remain intact as it is.

This error is being widely perpetuated in Europe, too.

Open to correction, if someone feels what I say is incorrect.
preacher1
preacher1 2
Well, if it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, then generally it is a duck, regardless of how it is colored and this looks and sounds like retaliation. Any inspection should have been noted by the flight crew and them make the determination for airworthiness.
preacher1
preacher1 2
You are correct in that this story says dented engine cowling. Another story, just posted under NEW SQUAWKS, says it was a complete nose coil missing, and there is a difference. You are correct in that we weren't there. If it was the nose coil, it definitely did not need to fly, regardless of who found it. Cowl damage is questionable and normally would not be a factor as long as all engine parts were clear. I'm glad it belongs to UAL and not me. LOL
akayemm
Er.A.K. Mittal 0
The following seems very unbiased and purely engineering oriented approach.
A passage from the reported news

" .... The directorate general of civil aviation (DGCA) is sending a team of officials to inspect the aircraft. If the inspections reveal major faults, the aircraft may be not be allowed to take off till the same are rectified. Incidentally, this is the second problem found in US-registered aircraft in India in last 10 days. Earlier, a major US cargo company's freighter aircraft was also found to have the top surface of its vertical stabilizer missing. "These things do not show FAA's own oversight on US-registered aircraft in a good light," said an official. ........ "

The detailed report is awaited. By all .
joelwiley
joel wiley 2
I don't wand to get into a missing patch but, without knowing the source, is it a bit difficult to determine whether that is biased or not.
"These things [2 data points without context] do not show...." does not show a 'purely engineering oriented approach".

The "...do not show . . . in a good light" comment reminds me of the old salt
"Professional guitar playing is better than beating up old ladies on the corner for a living"
akayemm
Er.A.K. Mittal 1
Let us hope for the best.
This downgrade has made the political interference take the back stage. Giving the much needed space to professionals .
akayemm
Er.A.K. Mittal 0
To over see and over sight are definitely different. Former is a welcome and well needed responsibility while latter is an unwanted and avoidable debility ! ( whether as two words or one word ! )
We, Indians , have been suffering from lack of ability to over see ! And hence the punishment.
PhotoFinish
PhotoFinish -1
The plane flies literally halfway around the world with no problem whatsoever, but then magically while on the ground, in a country that the FAA has determined that the airline regulator is ineffective, said ineffective regulator grounds a perfectly functional plane to stick it to an airline that happens to be based in the same country of the FAA.

Does that sound like a reasonable explanation of what's going on?
delravi
zx zczc -1
What crap..!

Making silly comments without even knowing what has actually happened.

It was the airlines own engineers who located the damage and obviously it was serious enough to be reported to the authorities.
delravi
zx zczc -1
Sure, India's aviation regulations do leave a lot to be desired but loose talk of 'retaliation' has no basis at all.

Any note-worthy damage to an aircraft is cause for concern as it could seriously jeopardize safety. In that interest alone, ensuring that the aircraft is air-worthy should always be the priority.

Making wild and baseless comments points to a puerile mind-set way beyond professionalism.
preacher1
preacher1 3
"DGCA officials, who inspected the aircraft thereafter, grounded the plane, terming the damage as "major", the sources said, adding it was being suspected that the damage may have been caused during take-off."
Maybe I'm wrong but that don't sound like United's Engineers.
preacher1
preacher1 3
That's what it sounds like to me
preacher1
preacher1 4
Sad part is, UAL, nor any airline, doesn't have a dog in that fight. Other Airlines flying that part of the world need to take notice. As my buddy John says, YOYO MF. (You're on your own and you can figure out the MF)
preacher1
preacher1 2
Well, like you, I am entitled to my opinion. I do resent the comment about the MINDSET, but it sure as heck seems more than coincidence, what with the FAA flagging AI, AI's problems with the spoilers on the 787, and failure to certify the Instrument landing capability of the 787 so it could land in fog at Delhi, when every other regulatory body has long ago. I didn't know it was routine for a governing body's engineers to inspect an aircraft belonging to a foreign flag. That is professionalism speaking!!!!!!!!!!
linbb
Boyd Butler 1
While it flew that far with damage there was no way to see it until it landed. When it was seen in a walk around how bad was it? Were you there?
preacher1
preacher1 2
It probably would have been or was caught on a walk around by the crew and probably would have been flagged anyway but the story says that DGCA officials( Directorate General of Civil Aviation, Government of India) inspected it and grounded it. I didn't know that was normal for them to inspect. It smacks of retaliation, whether it was airworthy or not.