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Duke of Cambridge makes water landing in Canada

Prince William has landed a Sea King helicopter on water as part of a demonstration of a search and rescue manoeuvre which is carried out in Canada. The prince was watched by crowds who braved the rain to see his flying skills in Dalvay-by-the-Sea. The Duchess of Cambridge was also watching from dry land. Canada is the only country which trains its Sea King pilots to perform 'waterbird' landings and the duke performed it for the first time. ( More...

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steve elliott 0
well; woopy doo!
indy2001 0
Let's see YOU do it, then. Actually, a couple of US pilots were killed during a similar demonstration maneuver, which is why only Canada routinely practices these landings. Performing your first such landing is dangerous enough, but to do it with the world watching takes some guts. The lamest thing about the video is the "commentary" by the BBC/CBC announcers.
While I was in an Army aviation reserve unit with Chinook helicopters in Everett, WA (around 1980), the pilots would do a water landing in Lake Washington just before an aircraft went in the shop for maintenance. I got to ride along for one of those landings - lots of "rotor wash" from that. I don't recall any Press coverage for our landing, however. I know, he's a prince and anything royalty does is newsworthy. :)
preacher1 0
Indy2001: maybe you need to run the links and see who's talking before you go sayin much. An ATP and a Commercial kinda outranks your private.
Just Sayin'
Well said, preacher1.
Where's the Aloe?
alistairm 0
You had to love all the yellow tape covering all the holes in the helicopter. Pretty interesting manouver, never seen it before.
This takes part because that helo is a 1963 model that was old when I was the flight surgeon at Shearwater in 1972-74. 436 was the "Water Bird" then and continues on but undoubtedly got an overhaul and a shine before flying over to Summerside for this Royal gig.
Those pilots train for haul down landings on destroyers in the North Atlantic and the water training has always been part of it. Unfortunately, without the tape and the waterproofing the real thing didn't exactly float as two went down in water during my two year watch there: 420 sank like a rock in moments (we lost three out of four) while the second floated long enough on its side for the crew to be rescued after the connector on the collective broke. We lost a third on land when the tail rotor fell off. Good friend flying that one ended up being almost two inches shorter but survived.
We had almost a 10% attrition of those birds in two years. Amazing how the names and faces of all involved in those three accidents stays with one after almost forty years when I can't remember what I had for breakfast.


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